Who Was Thomas Jefferson?

Who Was Thomas Jefferson?

Language: English

Pages: 112

ISBN: 0448431459

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Did you know that John Adams had to coax Thomas Jefferson into writing the Declaration of Independence? It's true. The shy Virginia statesman refused at first, but then went on to author one of our nation's most important and inspiring documents. The third U.S. president, Jefferson was also an architect, inventor, musician, farmer, and-what is certainly the most troubling aspect of his life-a slave owner. Finally, here's a biography for kids that unveils the many facets of this founding father's remarkable and complicated life.

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subject. Jefferson was cleared of wrongdoing in late 1781. Still, the harsh words from people of his own state hurt him deeply. To make things worse, while horseback riding, Thomas broke his left wrist and suffered other injuries. He couldn’t leave the house for six weeks. In the following year came the worst blow of all. By early 1782, the Jeffersons were back at Monticello. There, on May 8, Martha gave birth to her sixth and last child, Lucy Elizabeth. Martha grew weaker day by day following

their ship, ripping away some of the sails. Then another vessel nearly rammed into them. Their ship also caught fire—but fortunately, just after they had landed. The travelers reached Monticello two days before Christmas of 1789. Sally’s baby was born soon after, but the child seems to have lived only a short time. Jefferson’s relationship with Sally continued at Monticello. Over the next nineteen years, they had six more children. Two died in infancy. Their sons Beverley, Madison, and Eston,

their ship, ripping away some of the sails. Then another vessel nearly rammed into them. Their ship also caught fire—but fortunately, just after they had landed. The travelers reached Monticello two days before Christmas of 1789. Sally’s baby was born soon after, but the child seems to have lived only a short time. Jefferson’s relationship with Sally continued at Monticello. Over the next nineteen years, they had six more children. Two died in infancy. Their sons Beverley, Madison, and Eston,

Jefferson wanted a nation of small farmers and small towns. He favored a government that stayed out of people’s lives as much as possible. The Jefferson-Hamilton clash helped spark the creation of political parties. Jefferson became a leader of the Democratic-Republican Party. Hamilton became a leader of the Federalist Party. We still have two main political parties today. However, they are not the same as those led by Jefferson and Hamilton. Political differences weren’t the only problem

He once wrote: “Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate, than that these people [the slaves] are to be free.” And as far back as 1774, he had said that freeing the slaves was “the great object of desire” in the thirteen colonies. He also saw that he was part of the problem. Over the years, he had owned 400 slaves at Monticello, including Sally Hemings and his own four slave children. Jefferson considered ways to end slavery. Should all the slaves be freed at once? Should they be

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