Benjamin Franklin, American Genius: His Life and Ideas with 21 Activities (For Kids series)

Benjamin Franklin, American Genius: His Life and Ideas with 21 Activities (For Kids series)

Brandon Marie Miller

Language: English

Pages: 144

ISBN: 1556527578

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Benjamin Franklin was a 17-year-old runaway when he arrived in Philadelphia in 1723. Yet within days he’d found a job at a local print shop, met the woman he would eventually marry, and even attracted the attention of Pennsylvania’s governor. A decade later, he became a colonial celebrity with the publication of Poor Richard: An Almanack and would go on to become one of America’s most distinguished Founding Fathers. Franklin established the colonies’ first lending library, volunteer fire company, and postal service, and was a leading expert in the study of electricity. He represented the Pennsylvania colony in London but returned to help draft the Declaration of Independence. The new nation then named him Minister to France, where he helped secure financial and military aide for the breakaway republic.Author Brandon Marie Miller captures the essence of this exceptional individual through both his original writings and hands-on activities from the era. Readers will design and print an almanac cover, play a simple glass armonica (a Franklin invention), experiment with static electricity, build a barometer, and more. The text also includes a time line, glossary, Web and travel resources, and reading list for further study.

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knock down his competitor! But overall, he kept his paper free of controversy, taking care not to offend potential customers. Ben Franklin pushes a wheelbarrow full of paper through Philadelphia streets. CREATE YOUR OWN PAPER In colonial times, paper was most often made with old rags, creating a thick, heavy paper. As Ben’s business grew, his wife, Deborah, collected rags for recycling into paper. He eventually owned nearly 20 paper mills. MATERIALS Adult supervision required Newspaper,

come to blows.” He wrote to his sister Jane that he would never take “the best Office the king has to bestow, while such Tyrannic Measures are taking against my Country.” He waited to hear what the Continental Congress meeting in Philadelphia would decide to do. William, a royal governor, felt torn between duty to father and king. He urged his father to return home, where he would “receive every mark of regard and affection.” Franklin expected his son’s complete support. A Looking Glass for

much indulged those legs of yours in their indolence (laziness). Mr. F: Who is it that accuses me? The Gout: It is I, even I, the Gout. Mr. F: What! My enemy in person? The Gout: No, not your enemy. Mr. F: I repeat it, my enemy; for you would not only torment my body to death, but ruin my good name; you reproach me as a glutton and a tippler (drinker); now all the world, that knows me, will allow that I am neither the one nor the other. The Gout: The world may think as it pleases… but I

new constitution. His efforts to bring the other delegates together often left him exhausted. A year later he explained to a friend in France: “Not a move can be made that is not contested; the numerous objections confound the understanding; the wisest must agree to some unreasonable things, that reasonable ones of more consequence may be obtained.” Franklin contributed to the greatest compromise of the convention, which brought the wary large and small states together. There would be two houses

the years he’d helped many of his large family, his siblings, his nieces and nephews, and his children. He left his library of 4,000 books, money, and his papers to Temple. Sally received most of her father’s estate, with the note that Sally’s husband must free his slave. One of Sally’s most valuable gifts was a miniature portrait of King Louis XVI circled with diamonds. Franklin requested that Sally not make vain, expensive, and useless jewelry out of the diamonds. He also left money to both

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